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Archive for the ‘Photographs of Dogs’ Category

CDV-Wallis-Photo-Mullingar500

This early carte-de-visite shows a white Bull Terrier. Its ears are cropped, a practice which became illegal in Britain and Ireland from the 1880s. Bull and Staffordshire terriers are now distinct breeds, however, they were both known as Bull Terriers in the 1860s. Interestingly, the man credited with refining these breeds was Mullingar-born, James Hinks. Perhaps, he was on a return visit to his native town and brought along one of his prize-winning white terriers? Or it might just be a coincidence? I’ve been in touch with fellow librarians in The Kennel Club and they hope to explore the connection.

The photograph is very stark with none of the usual backdrops and accessories that we associate with Victorian portrait studios. However, this is an early image and the owner was probably keen to show off the dog’s features. You can just about make out the variegations of the fabric upon which the dog sits.

The studio is named as Wallis, Mullingar. This is most surely owned by the printer and later newspaper owner, Sampson Wallis (1836-1903), a Wexford man who is listed in Pigot’s Directory of 1870 as a stationer, bookseller and printer. He lived on Earl Street, Mullingar and was the owner and editor of the Westmeath Guardian for over a quarter of century from 1874. He was also listed as a local agent for the scheme offering ‘Free and Assisted Emigration to Queensland, Australia.’

The style of card, thin paper stock and brown tones of the albumen print lead me to believe that this image dates from between 1860 and 1870, most likely in the middle of this period.

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Werner-Dublin-500

Wynne-Castlebar-500

I have posted photographs of dogs and their owners taken in Irish studios before and thought that this pair were a nice addition to the series. They were taken by two very different studios: the Wynne business was based in the small town of Castlebar, County Mayo whilst the Werner family had several fashionable locations in Dublin’s city centre.

Louis Werner (1825-1901) came to Ireland from Alsace in the mid-nineteenth century and was originally engaged as a portrait painter. He had switched to photography by the 1860s and I’ve featured several examples of his work elsewhere on the blog. The business was eventually taken over by his his son, Alfred who also exhibited his pictoralist photography internationally at the Chicago World Fair in 1893; the 3rd Exposition d’art photographique, 1896, Paris and the American Institute Photographic Salon, New York, 1899. He favoured the platinotype or platinum print which gives a great tonal range. I love this portrait of two Dublin sisters and their small terrier dog. The girls’ flowing hair is shown beautifully and I reckon, their matching outfits date the photograph to the 1900s.

The earlier carte-de-visite by Wynne’s is great fun. The dog and owner are sporting a similar shaggy hairstyle and the photograph is full of great detail from the woman’s beautiful lace collar worn with a crucifix necklace to the velvet embroidered tablecloth. The National Photographic Archive have an amazing photograph of Thomas J. Wynne advertising his business ca.1880 in which you can zoom in on the details of the products he was selling. By 1901, the family also had branches of their photographic business in Tipperary Town and Loughrea, County Galway, the latter being run by 34 year-old Delia Wynne.

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Stuffed dogs were often as used as studio props in the 19th century although I am pretty sure that the animals featured in this post were alive when photographed.

There is something comical and slightly absurd about this image of a serious legal clerk called T.M. Barcroft and his dog! It was included in a photograph album compiled by the Foley family of Clontarf in the 1910s and 20s.

This early Dublin carte-de-visite features a nondescript looking dog whose owners obviously thought he was worthy of photographing. The card contains no additional information except for the photographer’s name and address, F.H. Mares, who worked from Grafton Street in the early 1860s and 70s.

This fashionable young lady was photographed along with her dog by the Leinster Photo Company of 39A Talbot Street, Dublin. I love the white feather boa! The photograph was posted from Tamworth, England to a friend in New Jersey in May 1910.

The photograph above includes both a baby and a dog and was taken at John J. Thompson in Omagh, County Tyrone. I wonder if the dog was jealous of the new arrival? Amazingly, the photographer has succeeded in getting all three to look at the camera. Note that the sitter’s feet are hidden behind a patterned cushion which blends in with the studio’s floor covering.

If you’d like to see more canine images, The Kennel Club’s exhibition of vintage dog photographs is showing in London until the 13th of January 2012 and you can see some of them here.

I also recommend the following titles which show that the family pet was a favourite subject for photographers throughout the years: The dog observed: photography 1844-1983 by Ruth Silverman begins with anonymous American daguerreotypes of the 1850s before moving on to the work of big name photographers like André Kertész and Lisette Model whilst Catherine Johnson and William Wegman’s Dogs is a beautiful book of found photographs which were published by Phaidon in 2007.

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