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Posts Tagged ‘Kodak advertisements’

When I first saw these 1931 photographs, I was immediately reminded of Arthur Penn’s film Bonnie and Clyde which tells the story of the infamous armed robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Snapshots found by police at the couple’s abandoned hideout in 1934 helped to spread their notoriety and are referenced within the film.There aren’t any guns visible in these images of a day trip to the seaside town of Ballycotton, County Cork, however, the 1930s styles are very similar to those worn by Bonnie and Clyde!

I particularly like the lady’s beret, tweed coat, sheer tights and clutch bag. Her companion wears his suit and Fedora hat with great swagger and charm. These hats were often worn tipped down over one eye at a rakish angle and were favored by American gangsters. Suits with double-breasted jackets and wide trouser legs were very fashionable in the early 1930s.

The Irish snapshots were taken on the 12th of July 1931 and were safely put into a Kodak wallet complete with negatives. The Kodak girl is, as ever, sporting the latest styles and her bobbed hair and white collar are not disimilar to the Ballycotton woman’s.

The promotional wallet mentions an amateur photographic competition with prizes awarded to photographs taken between the 1st of May and the 31st of August 1931.  I have featured Kodak advertising in an earlier post and look forward to seeing a recent book on Kodak ephemera based on the Martha Cooper collection.

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I came across this advertisement for Kodak in Ireland which dates from 1940. It mentions war time shortages and the fact that Kodak cameras were currently unavailable. The George Eastman House has an extensive collection of Kodak advertisements many of which, like the one above, depict fashionable young women. 

The ad also refers to Kodak House in Rathmines. This Art Deco building was designed by the architectural firm of Donnelly, Moore & Keatinge in 1930 and was used by the firm until 1982. William Sedgwick Keatinge was also responsible for later additions in 1949 and 1951. The building was recently renovated and the following atmospheric photograph demonstrates how well it has survived.

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